Commands by Zulu (14)

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Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Live stream a remote desktop over ssh using only ffmpeg
Play with the framerate option '-r' to scale back bandwidth usage. The '-s' option is the captured screan area, not the rescaled size. If you want to rescale add a second '-s' option after '-i :0'. Rescaling smaller will also decrease bandwidth.

use screen as a terminal emulator to connect to serial consoles
Use GNU/screen as a terminal emulator for anything serial console related. screen /dev/tty eg. screen /dev/ttyS0 9600 MacOSX: http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20061109133825654 Cheat Sheet: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/screen-terminal-emulator-cheat-sheet/

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

ping a range of IP addresses
nmap accepts a wide variety of addressing notation, multiple targets/ranges, etc.

World Cup Live Score
World Cup Live Score of the ongoing match. Alternative to have the live score with the match statistics: $ watch -n10 --no-title "w3m http://www.livescore.com/ |awk '/live [0-9H]+[^ ]/,/red cards/'"

sync svn working copy and remote repository (auto adding new files)
Lists the local files that are not present in the remote repository (lines beginning with ?) and add them.

Fast command-line directory browsing
After typing cd directory [enter] ls [enter] so many times, I figured I'd try to make it into a function. I was surprised how smoothly I was able to integrate it into my work on the command line. Just use cdls as you would cd. It will automatically list the directory contents after you cd into the directory. To make the command always available, add it to your .bashrc file. Not quite monumental, but still pretty convenient.

Use a Gmail virtual disk (GmailFS) on Ubuntu
Packages: gmailfs fuse-utils libfuse2 gvfs-fuse Config files: /etc/gmailfs/gmailfs.conf; ~/.gmailfs.conf (make a copy from the another one) Unmount: $ fusermount -u /mount/path/ /etc/fstab (Optional): none /mount/path/ gmailfs noauto,user[,username=USERNAME,password=PASSWORD,fsname=VOLUME] 0 0 NOTES: - The options between [] are optional since they already setuped on the config files. - The '-p' flag shows a prompt for the password entry. - It's necessary to add the user to the 'fuse' group. You can do that with: $ sudo chgrp fuse /dev/fuse and $ sudo usermod -a -G fuse USER - The volume name is not needed but highly recommended to avoid file corruption. Also choose a non-trivial name. - Google doesn't approve the use of Gmail account other than e-mail purposes. So, I recommend the creation of a new account for this.

The Chromium OS rootfs is mounted read-only. In developer mode you can disable the rootfs verification, enabling it to be modified.


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