Commands by abhikeny (2)

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Get lines count of a list of files
This command gives you the number of lines of every file in the folder and its subfolders matching the search options specified in the find command. It also gives the total amount of lines of these files. The combination of print0 and files0-from options makes the whole command simple and efficient.

Rot13 using the tr command
rot13 maps a..mn..z (A..MN..Z) to n..za..m (n..za..m) and so does this alias.

Grabs a random image from "~/wallpapers" and sets as the background
don't bother spawning a bc process or counting the number of options, just pick a random one. 'sort -R' sorts randomly, so pick the top one.

Monitor Linux/MD RAID Rebuild

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

echo something backwards
NAME rev - reverse lines of a file or files SYNOPSIS rev [file ...] DESCRIPTION The rev utility copies the specified files to the standard output, reversing the order of characters in every line. If no files are specified, the standard input is read. AVAILABILITY The rev command is part of the util-linux-ng package and is available from ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/util-linux-ng/.

Quickly build ulimit command from current values
It is helpful to know the current limits placed on your account, and using this shortcut is a quick way to figuring out which values to change for optimization or security. Alias is: $ alias ulimith="command ulimit -a|sed 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/;s/^/ulimit /'|tr '\n' ' ';echo" Here's the result of this command: $ ulimit -c 0 -d unlimited -e 0 -f unlimited -i 155648 -l 32 -m unlimited -n 8192 -p 8 -q 819200 -r 0 -s 10240 -t unlimited -u unlimited -v unlimited -x unlimited $ ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 155648 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 32 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) 8192 pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8 POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200 real-time priority (-r) 0 stack size (kbytes, -s) 10240 cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited max user processes (-u) unlimited virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited file locks (-x) unlimited

Don't save commands in bash history (only for current session)
Only from a remote machine: Only access to the server will be logged, but not the command. The same way, you can run any command without loggin it to history. ssh [email protected] will be registered in the history as well, and it's not usable.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Ping all hosts on 192.168.1.0/24
Will report back IP address's of all hosts that are UP.


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