Commands by acumon (1)

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Delete All Objects From An S3 Bucket Using S3cmd

Show git branches by date - useful for showing active branches
Print out list of all branches with last commit date to the branch, including relative time since commit and color coding.

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

Limit bandwidth usage by apt-get
Limits the usage of bandwidth by apt-get, in the example the command will use 30Kb/s ;) It should work for most apt-get actions (install, update, upgrade, dist-upgrade, etc.)

automount samba shares as devices in /mnt/
the middle command between the ; and ; is the vi commands that insert that line into the last line of the file, the esc with the carets is literally hitting the escape key, you have to have the smbfs package installed to do it, I use it to access my iTunes music on my mac from my linux PC's with amarok so I can play the music anywhere in the house. among other things, it allows you to access the files on that share from your computer anytime you're on that network.

Exclude inserting a table from a sql import
Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.

temporarily override alias of any command
say, someone has aliased ls to 'ls --color=always' and you want to temporarily override the alias (it does not override functions)

Monitor bandwidth by pid
Nethogs is a useful tool for monitor bandwidth consumption by pid. Tested on Debian an CentOs

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

another tweet function
This version of tweet() doesn't require you to put quotes around the body of your tweet... it also prompts you for password. It will still barf on a '!' character.


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