Commands by againy (0)

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Transfer large files/directories with no overhead over the network
This invokes tar on the remote machine and pipes the resulting tarfile over the network using ssh and is saved on the local machine. This is useful for making a one-off backup of a directory tree with zero storage overhead on the source. Variations on this include using compression on the source by using 'tar cfvp' or compression at the destination via $ ssh [email protected] "cd dir; tar cfp - *" | gzip - > file.tar.gz

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command

Search for files older than 30 days in a directory and list only their names not the full path

small CPU benchmark with PI, bc and time.
$ # 4 cores with 2500 pi digits $ CPUBENCH 4 2500 $. $ every core will use 100% cpu and you can see how fast they calculate it. $ if you do 50000 digitits and more it can take hours or days

Get ElasticSearch configuration and version details
Replace localhost:9200 with your server location and port. This is the ElasticSearch's default setup for local instances.

Print the 10 deepest directory paths

Disable sending of start/stop characters
This command disable sending of start/stop characters. It's useful when you want to use incremental reverse history search forward shortcut (Ctrl+s). To enable again, type: $ stty -ixoff

sync svn working copy and remote repository (auto adding new files)
Lists the local files that are not present in the remote repository (lines beginning with ?) and add them.

Show network throughput
Real gurus don't need fancy tools like iftop or jnettop.

generate iso


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