Commands by akrog (1)

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Prevent overwriting file when using redirection
If you set noclobber to on, bash won't allow redirection to overwrite existing files . $ set -o noclobber command turn the option on (default it s off ) . You can still append information but not overwrite the file .to turn it back off use : $ set +o noclobber . I use it because i overwrite a file by accident , after thought , content of the file was very important , creating a one more file mean nothing for my hard disk (we are not anymore on the 64 k memory time) , but content of file is far much important . What we call exeprience :(

Convert .flv to .3gp
Download YouTube videos as .flv and convert them to .3gp for your mobile phone.

What is my public IP-address?
Short command, easy to remember

shell equivalent of a boss button
Nobody wants the boss to notice when you're slacking off. This will fill your shell with random data, parts of it highlighted. Note that 'highlight' is the Perl module App::highlight, not "a universal sourcecode to formatted text converter." You'll also need Term::ANSIColor.

Intercept, monitor and manipulate a TCP connection.
This will handle multiple incoming connections. Also, found sed works best with -u flag (unbuffered io). Easiest way I've found to get ncat is to install nmap.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Replace Solaris vmstat numbers with human readable format
% cat ph-vmstat.awk # Return human readable numbers function hrnum(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1000000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1000000) ; } else if (a > 1000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fK", a/1000) ; } return(b) ; } # Return human readable storage function hrstorage(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1024000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fG", a/1024/1024) ; } else if (a > 1024) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1024) ; } return(b) ; } OFS=" " ; $1 !~ /[0-9].*/ {print} $1 ~ /[0-9].*/ { $4 = hrstorage($4) ; $5 = hrstorage($5) ; $9 = hrnum($9) ; $10 = hrnum($10) ; $17 = hrnum($17) ; $18 = hrnum($18) ; $19 = hrnum($19) ; print ; }

Btrfs: Find file names with checksum errors
Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes. The files may need to be deleted and replaced with backups.

Recall last argument of previous command
!$ recalls the last argument of the previous command. This is very useful when you have to operate several operations on the same file for example.

Recursive cat - concatenate files (filtered by extension) across multiple subdirectories into one file
Useful if you have to put together multiple files into one and they are scattered across subdirectories. For example: You need to combine all .sql files into one .sql file that would be sent to DBAs as a batch script. You do get a warning if you create a file by the same extension as the ones your searching for. find . -type f -name *.sql -exec cat {} > BatchFile.txt \;


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