Commands by amosshapira (1)

  • The command is useful when, e.g., booting an existing system with a rescue or installation CD where you need to chroot into the hard-disk and be able to do stuff which accesses kernel info (e.g. when installing Ubuntu desktop with LVM2 you need to mount and chroot the hard disk from a shell window in order to install packages and run initramfs inside chroot). The command assumes that /mnt/xxx is where the chroot'ed environment's root file system on the hard disk is mounted.


    3
    for i in sys dev proc; do sudo mount --bind /$i /mnt/xxx/$i; done
    amosshapira · 2009-04-20 16:52:14 1

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