Commands by andomthe (0)

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Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)
For example, to remove line 5 from foo, type: vi +5d +wq foo

Change proccess affinity.
Set the affinity of a process to a particular core(s). Arguments for processor include a comma separated list, or a range. (example: 1,2 or 0-3) You can use top in smp mode (Press 1) to see the changes to the affinity.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

List all execs in $PATH, usefull for grepping the resulting list
##Dependancies: bash coreutils Many executables in $PATH have the keyword somewhere other than the beginning in their file names. The command is useful for exploring the executables in $PATH like this. $ find ${PATH//:/ } -executable -type f -printf "%f\n" |grep admin lpadmin time-admin network-admin svnadmin users-admin django-admin shares-admin services-admin

Get information about memory modules
To take information about the characteristics of the installed memory modules.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

prints message in given argument on on center of screen
$ function echox { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines))) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2 ))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } echox prints given argument on bottom line center screen in terminal $ function echoxy { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)/2)) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } exhoxy prints given argument center screen $ function echos { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) $(($(tput cols)-$(echo ${#1})))&&tput sc`"$1"`tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) 0 && tput rc`; } $ while [ 1 ]; do echos "`date`"; done echos prints date and time on second from last line (used as status message) you can easily use these functions by placing them in your .bashrc file, make sure to source your .bashrc once you do

Show established network connections

Take a screenshot of the focused window with a 4 second countdown
Take a screenshot of the focused window with a 4 second countdown # shorten by adding to your .bashrc: alias sss='scrot -ucd4 && eog $(ls -tr | tail -n1)' $ echo -e "\nalias sss='scrot -ucd4 && eog $(ls -tr | tail -n1)'" >> ~/.bashrc -d 4 second delay -c display countdown -u focused window man scrot for more flags

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.


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