Commands by andreas (0)

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Compute the average number of KB per file for each dir
Use this to find identify if dirs mostly contain large or small files.

Start a quick rsync daemon for fast copying on internal secure network
"Sample output" shows a minimalistic configuration file.

Set all CPU cores' CPU frequency scaling governor to maximum performance

list files recursively by size

Move all comments the top of the file in vim
Python comments begin with a #. Modify to suit other languages. Other uses: Instead of m0 use m$ for end of file or d for deleting all comments.

Configure second monitor to sit to the right of laptop
You'll need to make sure your xorg.conf permits a virtual screen size this big. If it doesn't then xrandr should return a suitable error message that tells you the required size.

Move cursor to end of line

pretend to be busy in office to enjoy a cup of coffee
Dialog's gauge widget accepts progress updates on stdin. This version runs dialog once and updates it every second. There's no need to use timeout which causes screen flicker since it restarts dialog for each update.

Encode file path to URL
Really helpfull when play with files having spaces an other bad name. Easy to store and access names and path in just a field while saving it in a file. This format (URL) is directly supported by nautilus and firefox (and other browsers)

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).


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