Commands by animoid (1)

  • This will view the console and assumes the screen is 80 characters wide. Use /dev/vcs2 for the next virtual console.. etc. Show Sample Output


    15
    sudo cat /dev/vcs1 | fold -w 80
    animoid · 2009-04-15 08:49:48 2

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