Commands by antic (2)

  • Hide-and-Seek is one of the greatest games in the parent's arsenal. Your kid runs off and hides for several minutes, while waiting for you to find him/her. This gives you time to catch a breath and check your email without feeling like a loser. If you'd also like to take advantage of the counting time--claiming that thinking space as your own--use this command on your OSX terminal to maximize downtime. Also, if your kid is like mine, you can get away with "for i in {1..100};" :)


    -3
    txt="";for i in {1..20};do txt=$txt"$i. ";done;say $txt" Ready or not, here I come"
    antic · 2011-12-11 05:51:22 7
  • * Replace USERNAME with the desired svn username * Replace the first YYYY-MM-DD with the date you want to get the log (this starts at the midnight event that starts this date) * Replace the second YYYY-MM-DD with the date after you want to get the log (this will end the log scan on midnight of the previous day) Example, if I want the log for December 10, 2010, I would put {2010-12-10}:{2010-12-11} Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log -r '{YYYY-MM-DD}:{YYYY-MM-DD}' | sed -n '1p; 2,/^-/d; /USERNAME/,/^-/p' | grep -E -v '^(r[0-9]|---|$)' | sed 's/^/* /g'
    antic · 2010-12-22 17:52:19 1

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