Commands by atw527 (1)

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Copy all files. All normal files, all hidden files and all files starting with - (minus).
./* is for copying files starting with - .[!.]* is for copying hidden files and avoiding copying files from the parent directory. ..?* is for copying files starting with .. (avoids the directory ..) /path/to/dir the path to the directory where the files should be copied Can also be used as a script. Input argument is /path/to/dir in tcsh, replace .[!.]* with .[^.]*

git remove files which have been deleted
This command handles git rm'ing files that you've deleted.

Display a block of text with AWK

Change every instance of OLD to NEW in file FILE
Very quick way to change a word in a file. I use it all the time to change variable names in my PHP scripts (sed -i 's/$oldvar/$newvar/g' index.php)

Like top, but for files

If (and only if) the variable is not set, prompt users and give them a default option already filled in.
The read command reads input and puts it into a variable. With -i you set an initial value. In this case I used a known environment variable.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

most used commands in history (comprehensive)
Most of the "most used commands" approaches does not consider pipes and other complexities. This approach considers pipes, process substitution by backticks or $() and multiple commands separated by ; Perl regular expression breaks up each line using | or < ( or ; or ` or $( and picks the first word (excluding "do" in case of for loops) note: if you are using lots of perl one-liners, the perl commands will be counted as well in this approach, since semicolon is used as a separator

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested


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