Commands by b2e (4)

  • If you're addicted to command-line solutions of ordinary actions or if you just want to set your volume from bed via mobile phone SSH, you can set this alias and use it as setvol 50 for setting volume on 50% gain Works only with ALSA, tested on Ubuntu 8.10. Give me some info about your experience. TIP: Try aslo command "mute" to toggle mute/unmute sound. But I don't know if this works on all distros.


    1
    alias setvol='aumix -v'
    b2e · 2009-05-21 22:39:40 0
  • With this you can unlock your KDE4 session via SSH, via mobile phone SSH or e. g. scheduled task in crontab (without asking password). Useful when you need to grant somebody access to your locked profile remotely. Create an alias (e. g. as "unlock") and use with remote KDE4 lock. This works only on KDE4 boxes because KDE 3 is using utility with another name. Tested on Kubuntu 8.10.


    -1
    killall -s 9 krunner_lock
    b2e · 2009-05-21 22:29:06 1
  • Forgot to lock your computer? Want to lock it via SSH or mobile phone or use it for scheduled lock? TIP: Make a alias for this (e. g. as "lock"). I found some howtos for ugly X11 lock, but this will use regular KDE locking utility. Note that KDE 3 is using utility with another name (I guess with the same argument --forcelock) Tested on Kubuntu 8.10. Stay tuned for remote unlock.


    3
    DISPLAY=:0 /usr/lib/kde4/libexec/krunner_lock --forcelock >/dev/null 2>&1 &
    b2e · 2009-05-21 22:19:16 1
  • Tuned for short command line - you can set the path to sessionstore.js more reliable instead of use asterixes etc. Usable when you are not at home and really need to get your actual opened tabs on your home computer (via SSH). I am using it from my work if I forgot to bookmark some new interesting webpage, which I have visited at home. Also other way to list tabs when your firefox has crashed (restoring of tabs doesn't work always). This script includes also tabs which has been closed short time before.


    2
    F="$HOME/.moz*/fire*/*/session*.js" ; grep -Go 'entries:\[[^]]*' $F | cut -d[ -f2 | while read A ; do echo $A | sed s/url:/\n/g | tail -1 | cut -d\" -f2; done
    b2e · 2009-05-21 21:58:42 0

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