Commands by baitisj (1)

  • Adds high-performance, lightweight lz4 compression to speed the transfer of files over a trusted network link. Using (insecure) netcat results in a much faster transfer than using a ssh tunnel because of the lack of overhead. Also, LZ4 is as fast or faster than LZ0, much faster than gzip or LZMA, an in a worst-case scenario, incompressible data gets increased by 0.4% in size. Using LZMA or gzip compressors makes more sense in cases where the network link is the bottleneck, whereas LZ4 makes more sense if CPU time is more of a bottleneck.


    0
    On target: "nc -l 4000 | lz4c -d - | tar xvf -" On source: "tar -cf - . | lz4c | nc target_ip 4000"
    baitisj · 2014-08-02 05:09:30 0

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