Commands by bazzargh (4)

  • NB not 'namei -m .', as it slices the path you give it. Show Sample Output


    16
    namei -m $(pwd)
    bazzargh · 2012-07-24 15:27:20 2
  • Search in decimal rather than hex. od dumps the character list, cut to remove offsets, sort -u gives the used characters. seq gives the comparison list, but we need this sorted alphabetically for comm, which does the filtering. I drop to perl to convert back to characters (is there a better way?) and then use od to dump them in a print-safe format. Show Sample Output


    0
    comm -13 <(od -vw1 -tu1 dummy.txt|cut -c9-|sort -u) <(seq 0 127|sort)|perl -pe '$_=chr($_)'|od -c
    bazzargh · 2012-01-09 01:32:20 3
  • A different approach to the problem - maintain a small sorted list, print the largest as we go, then the top 10 at the end. I often find that the find and sort take a long time, and the large file might appear near the start of the find. By printing as we go, I get better feedback. The sort used in this will be much slower on perls older than 5.8. Show Sample Output


    -2
    find . -type f|perl -lne '@x=sort {$b->[0]<=>$a->[0]}[(stat($_))[7],$_],@x;splice(@x,11);print "@{$x[0]}";END{for(@x){print "@$_"}'
    bazzargh · 2012-01-08 14:43:43 2
  • the output of svn log is annoying to grep, since it spreads the useful info over multiple lines. This compacts the output down to one line so eg you can grep for a comment and see the rev, date & committer straight away. Updated: MUCH shorter, easier to remember. Now it just replaces newlines with spaces, except on '---' lines. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log | perl -l40pe 's/^-+/\n/'
    bazzargh · 2011-10-14 16:02:22 4

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