Commands by bazzargh (4)

  • NB not 'namei -m .', as it slices the path you give it. Show Sample Output


    16
    namei -m $(pwd)
    bazzargh · 2012-07-24 15:27:20 0
  • Search in decimal rather than hex. od dumps the character list, cut to remove offsets, sort -u gives the used characters. seq gives the comparison list, but we need this sorted alphabetically for comm, which does the filtering. I drop to perl to convert back to characters (is there a better way?) and then use od to dump them in a print-safe format. Show Sample Output


    0
    comm -13 <(od -vw1 -tu1 dummy.txt|cut -c9-|sort -u) <(seq 0 127|sort)|perl -pe '$_=chr($_)'|od -c
    bazzargh · 2012-01-09 01:32:20 1
  • A different approach to the problem - maintain a small sorted list, print the largest as we go, then the top 10 at the end. I often find that the find and sort take a long time, and the large file might appear near the start of the find. By printing as we go, I get better feedback. The sort used in this will be much slower on perls older than 5.8. Show Sample Output


    -2
    find . -type f|perl -lne '@x=sort {$b->[0]<=>$a->[0]}[(stat($_))[7],$_],@x;splice(@x,11);print "@{$x[0]}";END{for(@x){print "@$_"}'
    bazzargh · 2012-01-08 14:43:43 0
  • the output of svn log is annoying to grep, since it spreads the useful info over multiple lines. This compacts the output down to one line so eg you can grep for a comment and see the rev, date & committer straight away. Updated: MUCH shorter, easier to remember. Now it just replaces newlines with spaces, except on '---' lines. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log | perl -l40pe 's/^-+/\n/'
    bazzargh · 2011-10-14 16:02:22 0

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add a backup (or any other) suffix to a file
Very helpful when you've got complex filenames and needs to change just some small parts of it. Renaming a file called "i-made-a-small-typo-right-here" to "i-made-a-big-typo-right-here": $ mv -vi i-made-a-{small,big}-typo-right-here You could also copy multiple files, edit, remove, process, etc.

which program is this port belongs to ?
Sometimes you need to use a port that is already opened by some program , and you don't know who to "kill" for it to release - so, now you do !

online MAC address lookup

list all opened ports on host

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
Little faster alternative.

Fork Bomb for Windows
Quick and dirty forkbomb for all flavors of windows Do not use in production. Replace start with a command of your choice, this will just open a new command prompt and is pretty tricky to stop once started

Rename files in batch

Delete specific remote 'origin' branch 'gh-pages'

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Redirect incoming traffic to SSH, from a port of your choosing
Stuck behind a restrictive firewall at work, but really jonesing to putty home to your linux box for some colossal cave? Goodness knows I was...but the firewall at work blocked all outbound connections except for ports 80 and 443. (Those were wide open for outbound connections.) So now I putty over port 443 and have my linux box redirect it to port 22 (the SSH port) before it routes it internally. So, my specific command would be: $iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 22 Note that I use -A to append this command to the end of the chain. You could replace that with -I to insert it at the beginning (or at a specific rulenum). My linux box is running slackware, with a kernel from circa 2001. Hopefully the mechanics of iptables haven't changed since then. The command is untested under any other distros or less outdated kernels. Of course, the command should be easy enough to adapt to whatever service on your linux box you're trying to reach by changing the numbers (and possibly changing tcp to udp, or whatever). Between putty and psftp, however, I'm good to go for hours of time-killing.


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