Commands by bazzargh (4)

  • NB not 'namei -m .', as it slices the path you give it. Show Sample Output


    16
    namei -m $(pwd)
    bazzargh · 2012-07-24 15:27:20 0
  • Search in decimal rather than hex. od dumps the character list, cut to remove offsets, sort -u gives the used characters. seq gives the comparison list, but we need this sorted alphabetically for comm, which does the filtering. I drop to perl to convert back to characters (is there a better way?) and then use od to dump them in a print-safe format. Show Sample Output


    0
    comm -13 <(od -vw1 -tu1 dummy.txt|cut -c9-|sort -u) <(seq 0 127|sort)|perl -pe '$_=chr($_)'|od -c
    bazzargh · 2012-01-09 01:32:20 0
  • A different approach to the problem - maintain a small sorted list, print the largest as we go, then the top 10 at the end. I often find that the find and sort take a long time, and the large file might appear near the start of the find. By printing as we go, I get better feedback. The sort used in this will be much slower on perls older than 5.8. Show Sample Output


    -2
    find . -type f|perl -lne '@x=sort {$b->[0]<=>$a->[0]}[(stat($_))[7],$_],@x;splice(@x,11);print "@{$x[0]}";END{for(@x){print "@$_"}'
    bazzargh · 2012-01-08 14:43:43 0
  • the output of svn log is annoying to grep, since it spreads the useful info over multiple lines. This compacts the output down to one line so eg you can grep for a comment and see the rev, date & committer straight away. Updated: MUCH shorter, easier to remember. Now it just replaces newlines with spaces, except on '---' lines. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log | perl -l40pe 's/^-+/\n/'
    bazzargh · 2011-10-14 16:02:22 0

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Find longest running non-root processes on a machine
If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further. This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

SVN Clean
Removes all unversioned files and folders from an svn repository. Also: $ svn status --no-ignore | grep ^I | awk '{print $2}' | xargs rm -rf will remove those files which svn status ignores. Handy to add to a script which is in your path so you can run it from any repository (a la 'svn_clean.sh').

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Selecting a random file/folder of a folder
I used only shuf command.

Search commandlinefu from the command line
There's probably a more efficient way to do this rather than the relatively long perl program, but perl is my hammer, so text processing looks like a nail. This is of course a lot to type all at once. You can make it better by putting this somewhere: $ clf () { (curl -d "q=$@" http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete 2>/dev/null) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/$/\n\n/g;s/^ +|\([0-9]+ votes,//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'; } Then, to look up any command, you can do this: $ clf diff This is similar to http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch except that it's just one line, so more in the spirit of CLF, in my opinion.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Get a free shell account on a community server
Bash process substitution which curls the website 'hashbang.sh' and executes the shell script embedded in the page. This is obviously not the most secure way to run something like this, and we will scold you if you try. The smarter way would be: Download locally over SSL > curl https://hashbang.sh >> hashbang.sh Verify integrty with GPG (If available) > gpg --recv-keys 0xD2C4C74D8FAA96F5 > gpg --verify hashbang.sh Inspect source code > less hashbang.sh Run > chmod +x hashbang.sh > ./hashbang.sh

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

Run netcat to server files of current folder


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