Commands by bbrraacckk (0)

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list files recursively by size

Find pages returning 404 errors in apache logs
Finds the top ten pages returning an http response code of 404 in an apache log.

Convert AVI to iPhone MP4
Fir3net.com

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Browse system RAM in a human readable form
This command lets you see and scroll through all of the strings that are stored in the RAM at any given time. Press space bar to scroll through to see more pages (or use the arrow keys etc). Sometimes if you don't save that file that you were working on or want to get back something you closed it can be found floating around in here! The awk command only shows lines that are longer than 20 characters (to avoid seeing lots of junk that probably isn't "human readable"). If you want to dump the whole thing to a file replace the final '| less' with '> memorydump'. This is great for searching through many times (and with the added bonus that it doesn't overwrite any memory...). Here's a neat example to show up conversations that were had in pidgin (will probably work after it has been closed)... $sudo cat /proc/kcore | strings | grep '([0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\})' (depending on sudo settings it might be best to run $sudo su first to get to a # prompt)

print text in color red
eg: $printTextInColorRed foo bar foo bar [in red color]

Determine space taken by files of certain type
Just how much space are those zillions of database logs taking up ? How much will you gain on a compression rate of say 80% ? This little line gives you a good start for your calculations.

Clean the /boot directory
On Fedora clean the boot directory; erase older kernel

Sort files by size

Removes file with a dash in the beginning of the name


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