Commands by benschw (2)

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Edit video by cutting the part you like without transcoding.
Examples: The following will take frames starting at 15.2 seconds for a total of 45.9 seconds: $ mencoder -ss 15.2 -endpos 30.7 -oac copy -ovc copy mymovie.avi -o myeditedmovie.avi Keep in mind -endpos is the total time, i.e. the output video in this is 3 minutes 3 seconds in length: $ mencoder -ss 1 minute -endpos 2 minutes 3 seconds -oac copy -ovc copy mymovie.avi -o myeditedmovie.avi

online MAC address lookup

Monitor open connections for httpd including listen, count and sort it per IP
It's not my code, but I found it useful to know how many open connections per request I have on a machine to debug connections without opening another http connection for it. You can also decide to sort things out differently then the way it appears in here.

Chrome sucks
How much memory is chrome sucking?

run command on a group of nodes

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Binary digits Matrix effect
Prints 0's and 1's in The Matrix style. You can easily modify to print 0-9 digits using $RANDOM %10 insted of %2.

Rename files in batch

output your microphone to a remote computer's speaker
This will output the sound from your microphone port to the ssh target computer's speaker port. The sound quality is very bad, so you will hear a lot of hissing.

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.


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