Commands by bibe (5)

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What is my ip?

List all authors of a particular git project
List everyone who committed to a particular project, listed alphabetically. To list by commits, add -n to the shortlog.

Change attributes of files so you can edit them
I had problems in Ubuntu while trying to edit /etc/resolv.conf, even with sudo I couldn't make any change. After a 2 minutes search on google I found this command. Hope someone finds it useful. It works like chmod, with + and - to denote which attributes are being added and which are being removed. See other attributes on man pages or on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chattr

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Show top committers for SVN repositority for today

Show a notify popup in Gnome that expires in specified time and does not leave an icon in notifications tray
Tested in Gnome 3.4

Display kernel profile of currently executing functions in Solaris.
Lockstat will sample the kernel 977 times per second, and print out the functions that it sees executing on the CPU during the sample. The -s 10 switch tells lockstsat to not only print that function, but also show the call stack (up to 10 deep).

tar the current directory wihtout the absolute path
tars the current directory (and its children) in an archive of the same name (plus ".tar" :)) in the parent directory without the absolute path, so that when the archive is extracted, only the current directory name is created for the path. Assumes bash/zsh.

Get your current Public IP

Output a SSL certificate start or end date
A quick and simple way of outputting the start and end date of a certificate, you can simply use 'openssl x509 -in xxxxxx.crt -noout -enddate' to output the end date (ex. notAfter=Feb 01 11:30:32 2009 GMT) and with the date command you format the output to an ISO format. For the start date use the switch -startdate and for end date use -enddate.


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