Commands by bibe (5)

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Limit the transfer rate and size of data over a pipe
This example will close the pipe after transferring 100MB at a speed of 3MB per second.

Show some trivia related to the current date
Contrary to logic, typing calendar won't show a calendar, that's the job of cal. Typing calendar will show some trivia related to the current date. Tested against many Linux distros and FreeBSD.

Show a prettified list of nearby wireless APs

tail: watch a filelog
-f file(s) to be monitorized -n number of last line to be printed on the screen in this example, the content of two files are displayed

use google's text-to-speech and play in media player

Make changes in any profile available immediately/Change to default group
Changes your group to the default group, has the same effect as sourcing your profile/rc file (in any shell) or logging out and back in again.

chmod - change file permissions of a file to be similar of another

find text in a file
this will find text in the directory you specify and give you line where it appears.

Better recursive grep with pretty colors... requires ruby and gems (run: "gem install rak")

Getting started with tcpdump
At some point you want to know what packets are flowing on your network. Use tcpdump for this. The man page is obtuse, to say the least, so here are some simple commands to get you started. -n means show IP numbers and don't try to translate them to names. -l means write a line as soon as it is ready. -i eth0 means trace the packets flowing through the first ethernet interface. src or dst w.x.y.z traces only packets going to or from IP address w.x.y.z. port 80 traces only packets for HTTP. proto udp traces only packets for UDP protocol. Once you are happy with each option combine them with 'and' 'or' 'not' to get the effects you want.


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