Commands by bigstupid (3)

  • This find syntax seems a little easier to remember for me when I have to use -prune on AIX's find. It works with gnu find, too. Add whatever other find options after -prune Show Sample Output


    0
    find /some/directory/* -prune -type f -name *.log
    bigstupid · 2014-05-02 00:14:32 1
  • Shows a tree of the disks. Requires "tree" Show Sample Output


    2
    tree /dev/disk
    bigstupid · 2014-04-20 18:56:56 0
  • For a given filesystem return the LUN ID. Command assumes 1:1 relationship between fs:lv:hdisk:lun which may not be the case in all environments. Show Sample Output


    0
    getlunid() { lv=$(df -P $1|grep "^/dev/"|awk '{print $1}'|awk -F/ '{print $3}'); hd=$(lslv -l $lv|tail -1|awk '{print $1}');id=$(odmget -q "name like $hd AND attribute=unique_id" CuAt|grep "value ="|awk -F= '{print $2}'|tr -d '"');echo $id;}
    bigstupid · 2014-04-20 18:43:21 0

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Delete all files in a folder that don't match a certain file extension
Deletes all files in a folder that are NOT *.foo, *.bar or *.baz files. Edit the pattern inside the brackets as you like.

unbuffered tcpdump
Sometimes the question comes up: How to get unbuffered tcpdump output into the next program in the pipe? i.e. if your OS forces you to wait for the buffer to fill before the next program sees any of the output If you use -Uw- then you can't use -A (or -X or -XX) at the same time. When the question comes up, I've never seen anyone suggest this simple solution: chaining 2 tcpdump instances.

Using NMAP to check if a port is open or close
Using NMAP to check to see if port 22(SSH) is open on servers and network devices.

Rename files in batch

resolve short urls
since the most url shorteners respond with a header containing the Location: ... this works with most common shorteners

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Beep siren
Infinitely plays beeps with sinusoidally changing sound frequency. Ideal for alarm on an event.

Show all available colors on your terminal.
Using perl and tput, show all the colors with numbers that your actual $TERM can handle. If want to remove the numbers at beginning of new line, it should be something like this: $perl -E 'say `tput setb $_`," "x `tput cols`, `tput sgr0` for 0 .. (`tput colors` - 1)'

Bash Dialog
The dialog utility is used to create a basic level graphical user interface. We can use this in Shell script to create very useful programs.


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