Commands by bigstupid (3)

  • This find syntax seems a little easier to remember for me when I have to use -prune on AIX's find. It works with gnu find, too. Add whatever other find options after -prune Show Sample Output


    0
    find /some/directory/* -prune -type f -name *.log
    bigstupid · 2014-05-02 00:14:32 1
  • Shows a tree of the disks. Requires "tree" Show Sample Output


    2
    tree /dev/disk
    bigstupid · 2014-04-20 18:56:56 0
  • For a given filesystem return the LUN ID. Command assumes 1:1 relationship between fs:lv:hdisk:lun which may not be the case in all environments. Show Sample Output


    0
    getlunid() { lv=$(df -P $1|grep "^/dev/"|awk '{print $1}'|awk -F/ '{print $3}'); hd=$(lslv -l $lv|tail -1|awk '{print $1}');id=$(odmget -q "name like $hd AND attribute=unique_id" CuAt|grep "value ="|awk -F= '{print $2}'|tr -d '"');echo $id;}
    bigstupid · 2014-04-20 18:43:21 0

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Verify if user account exists in Linux / Unix

a function to find the fastest free DNS server
Evoke from the command like as: $ timeDNS commandlinefu.com . This isn't too terribly practical, but it is a good code example of using subshells to run the queries in parallel and the use of an "anonymous function" (a/k/a "inline group") to group i/o. . I'm assuming you have already defined your local DNS cache as ${local_DNS}, (here, it's 192.168.0.1). . You do need to install `moreutils` to get `sponge`. . If you're willing to wait, a slower version w/o sponge, (and w/o sorting), is this: . DNS () { for x in "192.168.0.1" "208.67.222.222" "208.67.220.220" "198.153.192.1" "198.153.194.1" "156.154.70.1" "156.154.71.1" "8.8.8.8" "8.8.4.4"; do (echo -n "$x "; dig @"$x" "$*"|grep Query) ; done ; }

Copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local machine
This command will copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local one. Ensure you are in the local directory you want to populate with the remote files before running the command. To copy a directory and it's contents, you could: $ ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/a/directory ; tar cvf - ./targetdir)" | tar xvf - This is especially useful on *nix'es that don't have 'scp' installed by default.

continuously print string as if being entered from the keyboard
Cycles continuously through a string printing each character with a random delay less than 1 second. First parameter is min, 2nd is max. Example: 1 3 means sleep random .1 to .3. Experiment with different values. The 3rd parameter is the string. The sleep will help with battery life/power consumption. $ cycle 1 3 $(openssl rand 100 | xxd -p) Fans of "The Shining" might get a kick out of this: $ cycle 1 4 ' All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.'

Burn CD/DVD from an iso, eject disc when finished.
cdrecord -scanbus will tell you the (x,y,z) value of your cdr (for example, mine is 3,0,0)

Creates Solaris alternate boot environment on another zpool.
PS: 'lustatus' gives the list of all alternate boot environments.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Add a progress counter to loop (see sample output)
For this hack you need following function: $ finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "$@" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: $ alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters.

ls not pattern
I've been looking for a way to do this for a while, get a not pattern for shell globs. This works, I'm using to grab logs from a remote server via scp.


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