Commands by binarynomad (1)

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Be notified about overheating of your CPU and/or motherboard
You'll be notified if your core 1 temperature exceeds 50 degrees, you can change the monitored device by editing the "Core 1" or change the critical temperature by editing the "-gt 50" part. Note: you must have lm-sensors installed and configured in order to get this command working.

Copy 3 files from 3 different servers and adds server name tag to file copied

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

make directory with current date

rename / move Uppercase filenames to lowercase filenames current directory
move filename/rename filenames with Uppercase to lowercase in current directory

Convert a date to timestamp
Simple way to get a timestamp from a date

Fast portscanner via Parallel

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Print all 256 colors for testing TERM or for a quick reference
This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output. $ tset xterm-256color at any rate that is some super lean code! Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile aa_256 () { ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`; for i in {0..256}; do o=00$i; echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x; done ) } From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

convert filenames in current directory to lowercase
This will convert filenames from uppercase to lowercase. I find this useful after downloading images from my digital camera. This works for English, but other languages may need something slightly more complex like this: $ for i in *; do mv "$i" "$(echo $i|tr [:upper:] [:lower:])"; done Also, the quote marks aren't necessary if your filenames don't contain spaces.


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