Commands by blackdude (1)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

find both total size and number of files below any given svn directory
afaik, svn doesn't have a good, scriptable way of telling you these two basic pieces of information.

Recover username and password for Technicolor TC7200 admin page (vulnerability)
The router Technicolor TC7200 has an exploit where the file http://192.168.0.1/goform/system/GatewaySettings.bin is open for unauthenticated access. Even though it is binary, the 2 last strings are the username and password for the pages for router management. It can be read using the 'strings' command, 'hexdump -C' or a hexadecimal editor. (default user/password = admin/admin) Reveals more configuration, including SSID name and Key for the wifi network: $wget -q -O - http://192.168.0.1/goform/system/GatewaySettings.bin Hexadecimal dump of the file: $wget -q -O - http://192.168.0.1/goform/system/GatewaySettings.bin | hexdump -C

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Update twitter with curl
Same as below, but no quotes are necessary when twitting more than one word

Show what PID is listening on port 80 on Linux

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

check open ports without netstat or lsof


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