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Print all git repos from a user

rename all images in folder with prefix of date and time from exif data
imagemagick is required

Verify/edit bash history command before executing it
Bash history commands are those that begin with the character ! (eg. the most popular 'sudo !!' Explained here => http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/13). By default bash immediately executes the history command. Setting this shell option will make bash first allow you to verify/edit an history command before executing it. To set this option permanently, put this command in ~/.profile or ~/.bashrc file. To unset this option issue following command. $shopt -u histverify

View and review the system process tree.
The "pstree" command uses special line-drawing characters. However, when piped into the "less" pager, these are normally disabled.

List known debian vulnerabilities on your system -- many of which may not yet be patched.
You can search for CVEs at https://security-tracker.debian.org/tracker/ or use --report to get full links. This can be added to cron, but unless you're going to do manual patches, you'd just be torturing yourself.

Signals list by NUMBER and NAME

Generic shell function for modifying files in-place
Some commands (such as sed and perl) have options to support in-place editing of files, but many commands do not. This shell function enables any command to change files in place. See the sample output for many examples. The function uses plain sh syntax and works with any POSIX shell or derivative, including zsh and bash.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

list files recursively by size

ls only directories
Like normal ls, but only lists directories. Can be used with -l to get more details (ls -lad */)


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