Commands by bojan (1)

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which procs have $PATH_REGEX open?
faster than lsof by at least x2 on my box.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Rename duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard
Renames duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard, so you get the latest copy and not a bunch of duplicates.

Short Information about loaded kernel modules
Liked command 4077 so I improved it, by doing all text manipulation with sed. "Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules." THX mohan43u

A signal trap that logs when your script was killed and what other processes were running at that time
trap is the bash builtin that allows you to execute commands when the current script receives a particular signal. Uses $0 for the script name, $$ for the script PID, tee to output to STDOUT as well as a log file and ps to log other running processes.

Print a list of installed Perl modules
This version works on an AIX system on which I have very limited permissions. The other version fails with "Can't open file /usr/opt/perl588/lib/site_perl/5.8.8/aix/auto/DBI/.packlist".

diff color words

Fake system time before running a command
Fake system time before running any command.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

List all available python modules


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