Commands by boombastic (1)

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find an unused unprivileged TCP port
perl-less way

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Schedule a script or command in x num hours, silently run in the background even if logged out
This is helpful for shell scripts, I use it in my custom php install script to schedule to delete the build files in 3 hours, as the php install script is completely automated and is made to run slow. Does require at, which some environments without crontab still do have. You can add as many commands to the at you want. Here's how I delete them in case the script gets killed. (trapped) atq |awk '{print $1}'|xargs -iJ atrm J &>/dev/null

force a rescan on a host of scsi devices (useful for adding partitions to vmware on the fly)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list files recursively by size

Super Speedy Hexadecimal or Octal Calculations and Conversions to Decimal.
^Hexadecimal Ten minus Octal Ten is Eight(in Decimal). $ echo "$(( 0xaf )) = $(( 0257 ))" ^Hexadecimal AF and Octal 257 are both Decimal 175.

Convert an existing Git repo to a bare repo
If you want to turn a Git repo into the origin that folks can push to, you should make it a bare repository. See: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2199897/git-convert-normal-to-bare-repository

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Generate list of words and their frequencies in a text file.


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