Commands by boustrophedon757 (2)

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Show a config file without comments
Shows a file without comments (at least those starting by #) - removes empty lines - removes lines starting by # or "some spaces/tabs then #'" Useful when you want to quickly see what you have to customize on a freshly installed application without reading the comments that sometimes are a full 1000 lines documentation :) While posting, I saw this http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1041/display-contents-of-a-file-wo-any-comments-or-blank-lines But it's dirty and incomplete, to my mind My original goal was to remove lines like "\t*#" but I can't figure out how to do a egrep '\t' on a command-line. Two workarounds if needed: $egrep -v 'press control + V then TAB then #' /your/file or $egrep -v -f some_file /your/file #where some_file contains what you want to exclude, example a really inserted TAB

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Alternative way to generate an XKCD #936 style 4 word password usig sed
This is what I came up to generate XKCD #936 style four-word password. Since first letter of every word is capitalized it looks a bit more readable to my eyes. Also strips single quotes. And yes - regex is a bit of a kludge, but that's the bes i could think of.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

disable history for current shell session
this will cause any commands that you have executed in the current shell session to not be written in your bash_history file upon logout

Find files with root setuids settings

whois surfing my web ?

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh [email protected] "cat - >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys"
You'll want to use this for passwordless logins. Same as ssh-copy-id, if you don't have it on your system.

Get the size of all the directories in current directory

Get first Git commit hash
https://git.kernel.org/cgit/git/git.git/commit/?id=ad5aeeded3295589b2573b143f754762a56f8f82


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