Commands by brubaker (4)

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

See n most used commands in your bash history
You can append these commands to the bottom of the history file to access them easier with the Up key: $ sort ~/.bash_history|uniq -c|sort -n|tail -n 10|tr -s " "|cut -d' ' -f3- >> ~/.bash_history

Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions
probably just like 1204, but uses tee as a filter (+ I actually understand how this one works)

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

auto complete arguments
Use it for command like : mkdir, chown, ls, less...

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
As of this writing, this requires a fairly recent version of util-linux, but is much simpler than the previous alternatives. Basically, lsblk gives a nice, human readable interface to all the blkid stuff. (Of course, I wouldn't recommend this if you're going to be parsing the output.) This command takes all the fun out of the previous nifty pipelines, but I felt I ought to at least mention it as an alternative since it is the most practical.

AES file encryption with openssl
To decrypt: openssl aes-256-cbc -d -in secrets.txt.enc -out secrets.txt.new Reference: http://tombuntu.com/index.php/2007/12/12/simple-file-encryption-with-openssl Optional parameter -a makes output base64 encoded, can be viewed in text editor or pasted in email

Binary clock
displays current time in "binary clock" format (loosely) inspired by: http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/ "Decoding": 8421 .... - 1st hour digit: 0 *..* - 2nd hour digit: 9 (8+1) .*.. - 1st minutes digit: 4 *..* - 2nd minutes digit: 9 (8+1) Prompt-command version: PROMPT_COMMAND='echo "10 i 2 o $(date +"%H%M"|cut -b 1,2,3,4 --output-delimiter=" ") f"|dc|tac|xargs printf "%04d\n"|tr "01" ".*"'

Change to $HOME - zsh, bash4
To change to $HOME in that manner you need to set a shell option. In zsh it is auto_cd, hence $ setopt -o auto_cd in bash4 it is autocd, hence $ shopt -s autocd What the option does is allow you to cd to a directory by just entering its name. This also works if the directory name is stored in a variable: $ www=/var/www/lighttpd; $www sends you to /var/www/lighttpd. CAUTION: If a command or function name identical to the directory name exists it takes precedence.


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