Commands by bstaz (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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split large video file
i have a large video file, 500+ MB, so i cant upload it to flickr, so to reduce the size i split it into 2 files. the command shows the splitting for the first file, from 0-4 minutes. ss is start time and t is duration (how long you want the output file to be). credit goes to philc: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=480343 NOTE: when i made the second half of the video, i got a *lot* of lines like this: frame= 0 fps= 0 q=0.0 size= 0kB time=10000000000.00 bitrate= 0.0kbit just be patient, it is working =)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list files recursively by size

Recursively Add Changed Files to Subversion
Extracted from http://www.howtogeek.com/wiki/Recursively_Add_Changed_Files_to_Subversion

print shared library dependencies
May be used on (embedded) systems lack ldd

Get File Names from touch commands
retrieve file names back from touch commands for them

Find the package that installed a command

Scrape commands from commandline fu's 1st page
just bored here at work ... if your are daring ... add '| bash' .... enjoy require 'ruby'

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

get a mysqldump with a timestamp in the filename and gzip it all in one go
Performs a mysqldump and gzip-compresses the output file with a timestamp in the resulting dump file. Inspect the file for integrity or fun with this command afterward, if you desire: $ zcat mysqldump-2009-06-12-07.41.01.tgz | less


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