Commands by bstaz (0)

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get diskusage of files modified during the last n days
get diskusage of files (in this case logfiles in /var/log) modified during the last n days: $ sudo find /var/log/ -mtime -n -type f | xargs du -ch n -> last modified n*24 hours ago Numeric arguments can be specified as +n for greater than n, -n for less than n, n for exactly n. => so 7*24 hours (about 7 days) is -7 $ sudo find /var/log/ -mtime -7 -type f | xargs du -ch | tail -n1

Convert files from DOS line endings to UNIX line endings
This method will also convert mac line endings.

Release memory used by the Linux kernel on caches
=1 --> to free pagecache =2 --> to free dentries and inodes =3 --> to free pagecache, dentries and inodes

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

PulseAudio: set the volume via command line
If you have more than one SINK

List docker volumes by container

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
Finds duplicates based on MD5 sum. Compares only files with the same size. Performance improvements on: $find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate The new version takes around 3 seconds where the old version took around 17 minutes. The bottle neck in the old command was the second find. It searches for the files with the specified file size. The new version keeps the file path and size from the beginning.

pipe output to notify-send
Route output to notify-send to show nice messages on the desktop, e.g. title and interpreter of the current radio stream

Change the homepage of Firefox
This command modifies the preferences file of Firefox that is located in .mozilla/firefox/*.default/prefs.js. It edits the file with sed and the -i option. Then it searches the string "browser.startup.homepage", and the string next to it (second string). Finally, it replaces the second string with the new homepage, that is http://sliceoflinux.com in the example. It doesn't work if you haven't set any homepage.

mkdir & cd into it as single command
The biggest advantage of this over the functions is that it is portable.


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