Commands by buhrietoe (2)

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Read all the S.M.A.R.T. data from a hard disk drive
This is to pull all the saved S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) information from a hard drive. This can give you an idea of the nature and extent of an issue on a failing hard drive.

Capitalize first letter of each word in a string
Capitalize first letter of each word in a string.

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Alternative way to generate an XKCD #936 style 4 word password usig sed
This is what I came up to generate XKCD #936 style four-word password. Since first letter of every word is capitalized it looks a bit more readable to my eyes. Also strips single quotes. And yes - regex is a bit of a kludge, but that's the bes i could think of.

Dump android contacts, sms
Crude, but works. Note for security, /data/ will be inaccessible unless your device has been *rooted*. On the other hand, if a device has been rooted, its data is now wide open to anyone with a USB cable and the above "one-liner". `adb` is one of the platform tools in the android SDK. To get SMS messages: $ adb pull /data/data/com.android.providers.telephony/databases/mmssms.db ; sqlite3 -batch

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

rsync directory tree including only files that match a certain find result.
'-mtime -10' syncs only files newer 10 days (-mtime is just one example, use whatever find expressions you need) printf %P: File's name with the name of the command line argument under which it was found removed. this way, you can use any src directory, no need to cd into your src directory first. using \\0 in printf and a corresponding --from0 in rsync ensures that even filenames with newline characters work (thanks syssyphus for #3808). both, #1481 and #3808 just work if you either copy the current directory (.) , or the filesystem root (/), otherwise the output from find and the source dir from rsync just don't match. #7685 works with an arbitrary source directory.

View ~/.ssh/known_hosts key information
Will return the SSH server key information for each host you have in your ~/.ssh/known_hosts file, including key size, key fingerprint, key IP address or domain name, and key type.


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