Commands by bw (6)

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Change prompt to MS-DOS one (joke)
This one eliminates the additional backslash at the end (which is not necessary)

Ctrl+S Ctrl+Q terminal output lock and unlock
These are simple shortcuts to pause and continue terminal output, works in most terminals and screen multiplexers like screen. You can use it to catch something if things change too fast, and scroll with Shift + PgUp PgDown. On linux console ScrollLock can also be used.

Open Vim with two windows
: new command allow to split a Vim screen in two separate windows. Each window can handle its own buffer. Passing the -c new options when Vim start cause to split screen automatically.

Pulls email password out of Plesk database for given email address.
This simply pulls the password out of the database for the given mail name for ease of use in testing emails that you would not normally have access to.

Find broken symlinks

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Vi - Matching Braces, Brackets, or Parentheses
This is a simple command for jumping to the matching brace, square bracket, or parentheses. For example, it can take you from the beginning of a function to the end with one key stroke. To delete everything between the pairs of {}, [], or (), issue the command: $ d% To replace text between pairs of braces, brackets, or parentheses, issue the command: $ c% You can also use this command to find out if an opening brace has been properly closed.

backup a directory in a timestamped tar.gz
creates a tar.gz with a name like: backup20090410_173053.tar.gz of a given directory. this file was made 10 April 2009 at 5:30:53pm see date's man page to customize the timestamp format

Mount important virtual system directories under chroot'ed directory
The command is useful when, e.g., booting an existing system with a rescue or installation CD where you need to chroot into the hard-disk and be able to do stuff which accesses kernel info (e.g. when installing Ubuntu desktop with LVM2 you need to mount and chroot the hard disk from a shell window in order to install packages and run initramfs inside chroot). The command assumes that /mnt/xxx is where the chroot'ed environment's root file system on the hard disk is mounted.

Find name of package which installed a given shell command
Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system.


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