Commands by campassi (1)

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Quickly Encrypt a file with gnupg and email it with mailx
This is a quick and easy way of encrypting files in a datastream, without ever really creating an output file from gpg. Useful with cron also, when file(s) have to be sent based on a set schedule.

Lists the supported memory types and how much your board can support.

Undo mkdir -p new/directory/path
Removes all directories on given path, working from right to left, and stops when reaching a non-empty directory Counterpart of $ mkdir -p new/directory/path Shortcut (must be issues as next command immediately after mkdir): $ ^mk^rm ( see http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/19/runs-previous-command-but-replacing )

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

get the latest version
to download latest version of "util", maybe insert a sort if they wont be shown in right order. curl lists all files on mirror, grep your util, tail -1 will gets the one lists on the bottom and get it with wget

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Count lines in a file with grep
Returns the number of lines in a file, emulates "wc -l" behavior with grep.

Recursively remove all subversion folders


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