Commands by carlesso (2)

  • This is useful for example if you are on ssh in a server and the server goes down without letting you out. This is part of a larget sets of escape sequences provided by ssh. You can find them with ~? Here's the list: ~. - terminate connection (and any multiplexed sessions) ~B - send a BREAK to the remote system ~C - open a command line ~R - request rekey ~V/v - decrease/increase verbosity (LogLevel) ~^Z - suspend ssh ~# - list forwarded connections ~& - background ssh (when waiting for connections to terminate) ~? - this message ~~ - send the escape character by typing it twice (Note that escapes are only recognized immediately after newline.) Show Sample Output


    11
    <Return>~.
    carlesso · 2013-06-26 13:34:58 0
  • Useful if you have a list of images called 1 2 3 4 and so on, you can adapt it to rewrite it as 4 (in this example) 0-padded number. Show Sample Output


    5
    for i in ???.jpg; do mv $i $(printf %04d $(basename $i .jpg) ).jpg ; done
    carlesso · 2010-11-18 23:48:41 0

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