Commands by cfb (1)

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Run iMacros from terminal
Run iMacros from terminal

A nice command for summarising repeated information

Find longest running non-root processes on a machine
If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further. This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

Create directory named after current date
Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless. In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'. This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name: $ alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'

Coping files, excluding certain files
Preserve file structure when coping and exclude some file o dir patterns

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Open Remote Desktop (RDP) from command line having a custom screen size
This example uses xfreerdp, which builds upon the development of rdesktop. This example usage will also send you the remote machine's sound.

Find common groups between two users
Updated according to flatcap's suggestion, thanks!

Locate config files of the program
Locate config files of the program. May not be used for interactive programs like vim.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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