Commands by chenlixiang (0)

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remove all snapshots from all virtual machines in vmware esx
Old snapshots can cause problems. It's best to remove them when finished. I use this script to remove all snapshots. The "while read" command is necessary because my vm names contain spaces. The "time" command reports how long the process runs.

Backup all MySQL Databases to individual files
Backs up all databases, excluding test, mysql, performance_schema, information_schema. Requires parallel to work, install parallel on Ubuntu by running: sudo aptitude install parallel

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Change the default editor for modifying the sudoers list.
On Ubuntu, the default editor for visudo is nano. To change the editor to something else (e.g., vi) use this command.

Set up alarm with fade-in, for graceful awakening
There are a lot of commands, which invokes your player at specified time. But I prefer not to jump from by bed, when alarm start to play. Instead, this script increases volume of mpd over time, which much more pleasant when you just woke up :)

Find the package that installed a command

Using tput to save, clear and restore the terminal contents
Very useful for interactive scripts where you would like to return the terminal contents to its original state before the script was run. This would be similar to how vi exits and returns you to your original terminal screen. Save and clear the terminal contents with: $tput smcup Execute some commands, then restore the saved terminal contents with: $tput rmcup

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

connect to X login screen via vnc
the $15 may change for you depending on your distro, etc...

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.


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