Commands by chicagonpg (1)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

aptbackup restore
Use when aptbackup will not start or you just want to see what's going on.

alias to close terminal with :q
Put this in your ~/.bashrc file (or the equivalent) If you use vim a lot, this alias will be immediately obvious. Your brain will thank you.

Recursively chmod all dirs to 755 and all files to 644

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Fast portscanner via Parallel

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Cut out a piece of film from a file. Choose an arbitrary length and starting time.
With: -vcodec, you choose what video codec the new file should be encoded with. Run ffmpeg -formats E to list all available video and audio encoders and file formats. copy, you choose the video encoder that just copies the file. -acodec, you choose what audio codec the new file should be encoded with. copy, you choose the audio encoder that just copies the file. -i originalfile, you provide the filename of the original file to ffmpeg -ss 00:01:30, you choose the starting time on the original file in this case 1 min and 30 seconds into the film -t 0:0:20, you choose the length of the new film newfile, you choose the name of the file created. Here is more information of how to use ffmpeg: http://www.ffmpeg.org/ffmpeg-doc.html

Find last reboot time
Displays time of last system boot

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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