Commands by chmurli (2)

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Cd Deluxe - improved cd command for *nix and windows
Hello, Take a look at this free cd replacement - "cd deluxe" a.k.a. "cdd". It is a free open source (GPLv3) application that I have created. As a long time command line enthusiast I have always been frustrated with the limited capabilities of the humble "cd" command. Especially since that is the most commonly used command line utility! See http://www.plan10.com/cdd for the full details and download information. Thanks, -Mike

Recursive search and replace (with bash only)
Replaces a string matching a pattern in one or several files found recursively in a particular folder.

perl insert character on the first line on your file

convert a line to a space

Simple complete system backup excluding files or directories
You can exclude more system folders or individual files which are not necessary for the backup and can be recreated after the restore procedure, like /lost+found, /mnt, /media, /tmp, /usr ... Restoring the above backup procedure is as simple as becoming root and typing: $ tar zxpf backup.tgz -C / You can extract any file or directory out of the backup.tgz file for recovery, for instance, if you have a corrupt or mis-configured fstab file, you could simply issue the command: $ tar zxpf backup.tgz /ect/fstab -C / Other options: v add verbose option to see files processed A far safer solution is to restore the desired files under a different directory, and then compare, move, or update the files to their original locations afterward.

Rapidly invoke an editor to write a long, complex, or tricky command
Allows you to edit your command using your chosen editor. Works in bash with "set -o vi".

Validate openssh key & print checksum

Find out current working directory of a process

Remove several files with ease
Rather than typing out all 10 files, you can use brace expansion to do the trick for you. This is useful for backup files, numbered files, or any files with a repeating pattern. Gives more control than 'rm file*' as I might want to keep others around.

(Debian/Ubuntu) Discover what package a file belongs to
'dpkg -S' just matches the string you supply it, so just using 'ls' as an argument matches any file from any package that has 'ls' anywhere in the filename. So usually it's a good idea to use an absolute path. You can see in the second example that 12 thousand files that are known to dpkg match the bare string 'ls'.


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