Commands by christianhenry (0)

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Make less act like cat if its input's contents can fit on one screen

password recovery on debian
Appended to grub boot parameters ... gives shell ... password recovery

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

World Cup Live Score
World Cup Live Score of the ongoing match. Alternative to have the live score with the match statistics: $ watch -n10 --no-title "w3m http://www.livescore.com/ |awk '/live [0-9H]+[^ ]/,/red cards/'"

Cut out a piece of film from a file. Choose an arbitrary length and starting time.
With: -vcodec, you choose what video codec the new file should be encoded with. Run ffmpeg -formats E to list all available video and audio encoders and file formats. copy, you choose the video encoder that just copies the file. -acodec, you choose what audio codec the new file should be encoded with. copy, you choose the audio encoder that just copies the file. -i originalfile, you provide the filename of the original file to ffmpeg -ss 00:01:30, you choose the starting time on the original file in this case 1 min and 30 seconds into the film -t 0:0:20, you choose the length of the new film newfile, you choose the name of the file created. Here is more information of how to use ffmpeg: http://www.ffmpeg.org/ffmpeg-doc.html

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Get a range of SVN revisions from svn diff and tar gz them
Handy when you need to create a list of files to be updated when subversion is not available on the remote host. You can take this tar file, and upload and extract it where you need it. Replace M and N with the revisions specific to yours. Make sure you do this from an updated (svn up) working directory.

Sort on multiple dis-contiguous keys/fields (can even specify key number/field from the end)
Notes: 1) -n-1 means sort key is the last field 2) -l is important if each separate record is on a new line (usually so for text files) 3) -j tells msort not to create log file (msort.log) in the working directory 4) may need to install msort package. 5) msort does lot more. Check man msort

Recursive replace of directory and file names in the current directory.
no grep, no perl, no pipe. even better in zsh/bash4: $ for i in **/*oldname*; do "mv $i ${i/oldname/newname/}"; done No find, no grep, no perl, no pipe

Test how well a web server handles concurrent connections and big load.
This command will execute 1000 requests to the http URL http://127.0.0.1:8000 handlink 100 concurent connections at a time. Then it will display statistics about the time that have been taken.


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