Commands by chstr (1)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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Completely wipe all data on your Synology NAS and reinstall DSM. (BE CAREFUL)

List only directories, one per line
omit the 1 (one) if you don't need one-per-line

How to run X without any graphics hardware
This starts an X server using Xvfb(1) (no graphics hardware required), then starts a VNC server on the display. Change :1 if there's a conflict with an existing display, and change 800x600x24 to suit your tastes (24 is the bit depth, 800x600 is the size). This command obviously requires X be installed, and also x11vnc(1); both are available via your favourite package manager. You can also use another VNC server of your choosing, as long as DISPLAY is set to the display of Xvfb(1). To change your desktop environment (the default is twm(1), which is rather fail), you can add it to your ~/.xinitrc file (see the startx(1) manpage for details).

Delete all but latest file in a directory
Useful for deleting old unused log files.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Determine whether a CPU has 64 bit capability or not
Check if you have 64bit by looking for "lm" in cpuinfo. lm stands for "long mem". This can also be used without being root.

Mac Sleep Timer
Schedule your Mac to sleep at any future time. Also wake, poweron, shutdown, wakeorpoweron. Or repeating with $ sudo pmset repeat wakeorpoweron MTWRFSU 7:00:00 Query with $ pmset -g sched Lots more at http://www.macenterprise.org/articles/powermanagementandschedulingviathecommandline

Optimal way of deleting huge numbers of files
Using xargs is better than: $ find /path/to/dir -type f -exec rm \-f {} \; as the -exec switch uses a separate process for each remove. xargs splits the streamed files into more managable subsets so less processes are required.

Screenshot Directly To Clipboard
This will take a screenshot of a selected area and save it as foo.png as well as sending it straight to the clipboard for pasting into GIMP, Anki, Zim, etc.


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