Commands by clone (2)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Copy input sent to a command to stderr
In the above example 'muspi merol' (the output of the first rev command) is sent to stderr and 'lorem ipsum' (the output of the second rev command) is sent to stdout. rev reverse lines of a file or files. This use of tee allows testing if a program correctly handles its input without using files that hold the data.

Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)
If you have the fdupes command, you'll save a lot of typing. It can do recursive searches (-r,-R) and it allows you to interactively select which of the duplicate files found you wish to keep or delete.

move you up one directory quickly
In bash, this turns on auto cd. If a command is just a directory name, it cd's into that directory.

Easily find latex package documentation
If the pdf/dvi/etc documentation for a latex package is already part of your local texmf tree, then texdoc will find and display it for you. If the documentation is not available on your system, it will bring up the package's webpage at CTAN to help you investigate.

Nmap list IPs in a network and saves in a txt

Get the size of all the directories in current directory

synchronicity
The British Government entering in the Gregorian era.

Graphical tree of sub-directories
Prints a graphical directory tree from your current directory

Count the total number of files in each immediate subdirectory
counts the total (recursive) number of files in the immediate (depth 1) subdirectories as well as the current one and displays them sorted. Fixed, as per ashawley's comment


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