Commands by cnyg (1)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

(Debian/Ubuntu) Discover what package a file belongs to
'dpkg -S' just matches the string you supply it, so just using 'ls' as an argument matches any file from any package that has 'ls' anywhere in the filename. So usually it's a good idea to use an absolute path. You can see in the second example that 12 thousand files that are known to dpkg match the bare string 'ls'.

create a progress bar...
A simple way yo do a progress bar like wget.

Recurse through directories easily
This is a simple case of recursing through all directories, adding the '.bak' extension to every file. Of course, the 'cp $file $file.bak' could be any code you need to apply to your recursion, including tests, other functions, creating variables, doing math, etc. Simple and clean recursion.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Show biggest files/directories, biggest first with 'k,m,g' eyecandy
I use this on debian testing, works like the other sorted du variants, but i like small numbers and suffixes :)

Find out the last times your system was rebooted (for the duration of wtmp).

invoke MATLAB functions from command line
`-r script.m` also possible

Replace spaces in a file with hyphens

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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