Commands by codecaine (2)

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Generate pretty secure random passwords
These are my favourite switches on pwgen: -B Don't include ambiguous characters in the password -n Include at least one number in the password -y Include at least one special symbol in the password -c Include at least one capital letter in the password It just works! Add a number to set password length, add another to set how many password to output. Example: pwgen -Bnyc 12 20 this will output 20 password of 12 chars length.

Show all machines on the network
Depending on the network setup, you may not get the hostname.

Detach a process from the current shell
Continue to execute the command in background even though quitting the shell.

Generate random number with shuf
If you don't have seq or shuf, bash can be used.

Find out which process uses an old lib and needs a restart after a system update
Shows the full output of lsof.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

make a log of a terminal session
Creates a log of a session in a file called typescript. Or specify the file with: $script filename Exit the session with control-d.

tail -f a log file over ssh into growl

STAT Function showing ALL info, stat options, and descriptions
This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. $ alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: $ ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'

list all file extensions in a directory
If your grep doesn't have an -o option, you can use sed instead.


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