Commands by conan (2)

  • You know there 'cd -' to go to the previous directory you were standing before, but it will no record more than one. With these alias you can now record all your directory changes and go back whenever you need it. However you will have to get accustomed to use 'cd ~' from now on to go to your home directory.


    -2
    alias cd='pushd'; alias cd-='popd'
    conan · 2010-11-30 16:44:46 1
  • Sometimes when I find a new cool command I want to know: 1.- which package owns it, and 2.- are there any other cool commands provided by this package? Since I don't necessarily need to know always both, I don't use this version, but I bundle it into two separate functions: # get command package owner # it can work without the full path, but sometimes fails, so better to provide it with whereis command owner () { pacman -Qo `whereis $1 | awk '{print $2}'` } whatelse () { package=`owner ${1} | sed -e 's/.*is owned by \([[:alpha:]]\+\).*/\1/'` pacman -Ql $package | grep 'bin' } Show Sample Output


    0
    w=`whereis <command> | awk '{print $2}'`; p=`pacman -Qo $w | sed -e 's/.*is owned by \([[:alpha:]]\+\).*/\1/'`; pacman -Ql $p | grep 'bin'
    conan · 2010-10-01 04:28:04 0

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