Commands by cooper (1)

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Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

Get creation date of a file on ext2-3-4 fs
Return the creation date of a file on ext2, 3, 4 filesystems, because stat command won't show it. Useful on ubuntu, debian, and else

find and delete empty dirs, start in current working dir
A quick way to find and delete empty dirs, it starts in the current working directory. If you do find . -empty -type d you will see what could be removed, or to a test run.

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Kill all processes belonging to a user

Exclude a string with awk

Most used command

Import SQL into MySQL with a progress meter
This uses PV to monitor the progress of the MySQL import and displays it though Zenity. You could also do this pv ~/database.sql | mysql -u root -pPASSWORD -D database_name and get a display in the CLI that looks like this 2.19MB 0:00:06 [ 160kB/s] [> ] 5% ETA 0:01:40 My Nautalus script using this command is here http://www.daniweb.com/forums/post1253285.html#post1253285

Run a command, redirecting output to a file, then edit the file with vim.
This is one of those 'nothing' shell functions ...which I use all the time. If the command contains spaces, it must be quoted, e.g. $ vimcmd 'svn diff' /tmp/svndiff.out If I want to keep the output of the command that I'm running, I use vimcmd. If I don't need to keep the output, I use this: $ vim


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