Commands by copocaneta (4)

  • List the busiest scripts/files running on a cPanel server with domain showing (column $12). Show Sample Output


    0
    /usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 http://127.0.0.1/whm-server-status | grep GET | awk '{print $12 $14}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
    copocaneta · 2014-03-12 13:24:40 0
  • IP addresses and number of connections connected to port 80. Show Sample Output


    2
    netstat -tn 2>/dev/null | grep ':80 ' | awk '{print $5}' |sed -e 's/::ffff://' | cut -f1 -d: | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
    copocaneta · 2014-03-12 12:43:07 0

  • 1
    /usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 http://127.0.0.1/whm-server-status | awk 'BEGIN { FS = " " } ; { print $12 }' | sed '/^$/d' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
    copocaneta · 2014-03-12 12:38:24 0
  • Easiest way to obtain the busiest website list (sorted by number of process running). Show Sample Output


    0
    /usr/bin/lynx -dump -width 500 http://127.0.0.1/whm-server-status | grep GET | awk '{print $12}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head
    copocaneta · 2014-03-12 12:31:34 0

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