Commands by craigds (1)

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Smart renaming
A powerfull way to rename file using sed groups. & stand for the matched expression. \1 referes to the first group between parenthesis. \2 to the second.

use screen as a terminal emulator to connect to serial consoles
Use GNU/screen as a terminal emulator for anything serial console related. screen /dev/tty eg. screen /dev/ttyS0 9600 MacOSX: http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20061109133825654 Cheat Sheet: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/screen-terminal-emulator-cheat-sheet/

sum numbers in the file (or stdin)
add integers from the stdin and print out the result usually, cat /tmp/file | echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0))

Run a command as root, with a delay
$ sleep 1h ; sudo command or $ sudo sleep 1h ; sudo command won't work, because by the time the delay is up, sudo will want your password again.

Sort movies by length, longest first
handles file names with spaces and colons, fixes sort (numeric!), uses mplayer, same output format as other alternatives

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Create a new file

Display a list of RPMs installed on a particular date
Find out which RPMs were installed on a particular date. These would (naturally) include update RPMs. This example shows searching for "Thu 05 Mar" (with grep). Alternatively, pipe it to less so you can search inside less (with less's neat text highlighting of the search term): rpm -qa --queryformat '%{installtime} \"%{vendor}\" %{name}-%{version}-%{release} %{installtime:date}\n' | less # (this example) search term: Thu 05 Mar

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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