Commands by crispin5 (0)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Add all files not under subversion control

Watch and cat the last file to enter a directory
Great for watching things like Maildir's or any other queue directory.

Adding Color Escape Codes to global CC array for use by echo -e
I was looking for the fastest way to create a bunch of ansi escapes for use in echo -e commands throughout a lot of my shell scripts. This is what I came up with, and I actually stick that loop command in a function and then just call that at the beginning of my scripts to not clutter the environment with these escape codes, which can wreck havok on my terminal when I'm dumping the environment. More of a cool way to store escape ansi codes in an array. You can echo them like: $ echo -e "${CC[15]}This text is black on bright green background." I usually just use with a function: $ # setup_colors - Adds colors to array CC for global use $ # 30 - Black, 31 - Red, 32 - Green, 33 - Yellow, 34 - Blue, 35 - Magenta, 36 - Blue/Green, 37 - White, 30/42 - Black on Green '30\;42' $ function setup_colors(){ declare -ax CC; for i in `seq 0 7`;do ii=$(($i+7));CC[$i]="\033[1;3${i}m";CC[$ii]="\033[0;3${i}m";done;CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; export R='\033[0;00m';export X="\033[1;37m"; }; $ export -f setup_colors CC[15] has a background of bright green which is why it is separate. R resets everything, and X is my default font of bright white. $ CC[15]="\033[30;42m"; R=$'\033[0;00m'; X=$'\033[1;37m' Those are just my favorite colors that I often use in my scripts. You can test which colors by running $ for i in $(seq 0 $((${#CC[@]} - 1))); do echo -e "${CC[$i]}[$i]\n$R"; done See: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html for more usage.

ps a process keeping the header info so you know what the columns of numbers mean!
USER PID %CPU %MEM VSZ RSS TTY STAT START TIME COMMAND root 1828 0.0 0.0 5396 476 ? Ss 2008 0:00 /usr/sbin/sshd

list files recursively by size

Terminal Escape Code Zen - Strace and Tput
Depending on the TERM, the terminfo version, ncurses version, etc.. you may be using a varied assortment of terminal escape codes. With this command you can easily find out exactly what is going on.. This is terminal escape zen! $ ( 2>&2 strace -f -F -e write -s 1000 sh -c 'echo -e "initc\nis2\ncnorm\nrmso\nsgr0" | tput -S' 2>&1 ) | grep -o '"\\[^"]*"' --color=always "\33]4;%p1%d;rgb:%p2%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p3%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p4%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X\33\\\33[!p\33[?3;4l\33[4l\33>\33[?12l\33[?25h\33[27m\33(B\33[m" Lets say you want to find out what you need to echo in order to get the text to blink.. $ echo -e "`tput blink`This will blink`tput sgr0` This wont" Now you can use this function instead of calling tput (tput is much smarter for portable code because it works differently depending on the current TERM, and tput -T anyterm works too.) to turn that echo into a much faster executing code. tput queries files, opens files, etc.. but echo is very strait and narrow. So now you can do this: $ echo -e "\33[5mThis will blink\33(B\33[m This wont" More at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Send remote command output to your local clipboard
This command will copy command's output into your local clipboard

Force the script to be started as root
Place this code at the beginning of your script to ensure that it can only be executed by the root.

Search commandlinefu from the command line
There's probably a more efficient way to do this rather than the relatively long perl program, but perl is my hammer, so text processing looks like a nail. This is of course a lot to type all at once. You can make it better by putting this somewhere: $ clf () { (curl -d "q=$@" http://www.commandlinefu.com/search/autocomplete 2>/dev/null) | egrep 'autocomplete|votes|destination' | perl -pi -e 's/$/\n\n/g;s/^ +|\([0-9]+ votes,//g;s/^\//http:\/\/commandlinefu.com\//g'; } Then, to look up any command, you can do this: $ clf diff This is similar to http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch except that it's just one line, so more in the spirit of CLF, in my opinion.


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