Commands by cromadon (3)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Google URL shortener
(1) required: python-googl ( install by: pip install python-googl ) (2) get from google API console https://code.google.com/apis/console/

Get a list of IP Addresses that have failed to login via SSH
This command shows a sorted list of the IP addresses from which there have been authentication errors via SSH (possible script kiddies trying to gain access to your server), it eliminates duplicates so it's easier to read, but you can remove the "uniq" command at the end, or even do a "uniq -c" to have a count of how many times each IP address shows in the log (the path to the log may vary from system to system)

Determine the version of a specific package with RPM
In this case, I'm getting the package version for 'redhat-release', but of course, this can be applied to any package installed on the filesystem. This is very handy in scripts that need to determine just the version of the package, without the package name and all the sed and grep hackery to get to the data you want. To find out all the support format strings that 'rpm --qf' supports: $ rpm --querytags

count how many times a string appears in a (source code) tree
grep -o puts each occurrence in a separate line

print code 3-up and syntax-highlighted for easy beach-time study
This is the setup I'm using for my largest project. It gives 357 lines per page (per side), which makes it fairly easy to carry around a significant amount of code on a few sheets of paper. Try it. (I stick to the 80 column convention in my coding. For wider code, you'll have to adjust this.)

Recursive find and replace file extension / suffix (mass rename files)
Find recursively all files in ~/Notes with the extension '.md' and pipe that via xargs to rename command, which will replace every '.md' to '.txt' in this example (existing files will not be overwritten).

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

Print stack trace of a core file without needing to enter gdb interactively
The pstack command prints a stack trace of running processes without needing to attach a debugger, but what about core files? The answer, of course, is to use this command. Usage: gdbbt program corefile

Change the extension of a filename by using rename to convert
This will change all files ending in .JPG to .jpg and will work with any file extension

Analyze awk fields
Breaks down and numbers each line and it's fields. This is really useful when you are going to parse something with awk but aren't sure exactly where to start.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: