Commands by csmeder (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Delete all empty lines from a file with vim
If you need to delete lines that may contain space characters (such as tabs or spaces) as well as empty ones, try: $:v/\S/d Just an alternative.

Update twitter with curl
Same as below, but no quotes are necessary when twitting more than one word

Display the top ten running processes - sorted by memory usage

generate 30 x 30 matrix
Replaces hexdump with the more succint xxd, and the sed was unnecessarily complex.

Monitor a file with tail with timestamps added
This is useful when watching a log file that does not contain timestamps itself. If the file already has content when starting the command, the first lines will have the "wrong" timestamp when the command was started and not when the lines were originally written.

Bash function that saves bash functions to file from shell session
The simpler, 1-arg version is save_function(){ { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; }`

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Who needs pipes?
or: C

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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