Commands by ctcrnitv (7)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List the URLs of tabs of the frontmost Chrome window in OS X
This also works with Safari if you just change the application name. Replace $ window 1 with $ windows to list the URLs of tabs in all windows instead of only the frontmost window. This also includes titles: $ osascript -e{'set o to""','tell app"google chrome"','repeat with t in tabs of window 1','set o to o&url of t&"\n"&" "&title of t&"\n"',end,end}|sed \$d .

Remove a range of lines from a file

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Are the two lines anagrams?
This is just a slight alternative that wraps all of #7917 in a function that can be executed

Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format
Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format using sed command

Opens vi/vim at pattern in file
Open up vi or vim at the first instance of a pattern in [file]. Useful if you know where you want to be, like "PermitRootLogin" in sshd_config. Also, vi +10 [file] will open up a file at line 10. VERY useful when you get "error at line 10" type of output.

Execute a command without saving it in the history
Yes, by correctly setting the HIST* variables you can make certain commands not saved in history. But that's complicated and easy to make a mistake. If you set HISTFILE= to blank, nothing in your current shell session will be saved in history. Although this is not a precise answer to the subject, but it's very simple.

Auto-log commands
A quick alias I use right before logging into a server so that I have a log of the transactions as well as the ability to re-connect from another computer. Useful for when your boss says "what commands did you run again on that server?" and you had already closed the terminal ;) I wrapped it in a script now, with more features, but this is the heart of it. Never leave home without it.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: