Commands by d24m (1)

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This command can be used to extract the IP address of the network.
can be used within a script to configure iptables for example: iface=$2 inet_ip=`ifconfig "$iface" | grep inet | cut -d: -f2 | cut -d ' ' -f1` ipt="sudo /sbin/iptables" ......................... ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A INPUT -i $iface ! -f -p tcp -s $UL -d $inet_ip --sport 1023: --dport 3306 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- $ipt -A OUTPUT -o $iface -p tcp -s $inet_ip -d $UL --sport 3306 --dport 1023: -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

prints line numbers
the sed way to print line numbers

umount all nfs mounts on machine

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Get all IPs via ifconfig
The initial version of this command also outputted extra empty lines, so it went like this: 192.168.166.48 127.0.0.1 This happened on Ubuntu, i haven't tested on anything else.

Remove embedded fonts from a pdf.
It's sometimes useful to strip the embedded fonts from a pdf, for importing into something like Inkscape. Be warned, this will increase the size of a pdf substantially. I tried this with only gs writing with -sDEVICE=pdfwrite but it doesn't seem to work, so I just pipe postscript output to ps2pdf for the same effect.

send echo to socket network
Using netcat, usuallly installed on debian/ubuntu. Also to test against a sample server the following two commands may help echo got milk? | netcat -l -p 25 python -c "import SocketServer; SocketServer.BaseRequestHandler.handle = lambda self: self.request.send('got milk?\n'); SocketServer.TCPServer(('0.0.0.0', 25), SocketServer.BaseRequestHandler).serve_forever()"

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

Print diagram of user/groups
Parses /etc/group to "dot" format and pases it to "display" (imagemagick) to show a usefull diagram of users and groups (don't show empty groups).


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