Commands by daryltucker (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Get a range of SVN revisions from svn diff and tar gz them
Handy when you need to create a list of files to be updated when subversion is not available on the remote host. You can take this tar file, and upload and extract it where you need it. Replace M and N with the revisions specific to yours. Make sure you do this from an updated (svn up) working directory.

create SQL-statements from textfile with awk
inputfile.txt is a space-separated textfile, 1st column contains the items (id) I want to put into my SQL statement. 39 = charactercode for single tick ' $1 = first column If inputfile.txt is a CSV-file separated by "," use FS= to define your own field-separator: $ awk 'BEGIN {FS=","; }{printf "select * from table where id = %c%s%c;\n",39,$1,39; }' inputfile.txt

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

List latest 5 modified files recursively
The output format is given by the -printf parameter: %T@ = modify time in seconds since Jan. 1, 1970, 00:00 GMT, with fractional part. Mandatory, hidden in the end. %TY-%Tm-%Td %TH:%TM:%.2TS = modify time as YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS. Optional. %p = file path Refer to http://linux.die.net/man/1/find for more about -printf formatting. ------------------------ sort -nr = sort numerically and reverse (higher values - most recent timestamp - first) head -n 5 = get only 5 first lines (change 5 to whatever you want) cut -f2- -d" " = trim first field (timestamp, used only for sorting) ------------------------ Very useful for building scripts for detecting malicious files upload and malware injections.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions
probably just like 1204, but uses tee as a filter (+ I actually understand how this one works)

send tweets to twitter (and get user details)
great for outputting tweets from cron jobs and batch scripts

LIST FILENAMES OF FILES CREATED TODAY IN CURRENT DIRECTORY
Then pipe to 'xargs ls' for a familiar listing, possibly using find's -print0 and xarg's -0 options.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: