Commands by davidk (1)

  • I find the other timers are inaccurate. It takes some microseconds to perform the date function. Therefore, using date/time math to calculate the time for us results in millisecond accuracy. This is tailored to the BusyBox date function. May need to change things around for GNU date function. Show Sample Output


    -1
    let T=$(date +%s)+3*60;while [ $(date +%s) -le $T ]; do let i=$T-$(date +%s); echo -ne "\r$(date -d"0:0:$i" +%H:%M:%S)"; sleep 0.3; done
    davidk · 2019-10-22 15:04:21 1

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